Two Cakes Fit for a King Folktales from Vietnam A Latitude 20 Book

Two Cakes Fit for a King Folktales from Vietnam A Latitude 20 Book




For centuries, Vietnamese have sustained the history of their nation, both actual and mythic, through their folklore. These stories, passed from generation to generation, contain not only the national saga, but also fundamental cultural values that Vietnamese hold dear. Some stories, like “A Daughter’s Love,” are imaginative accounts of early Vietnamese history. Others, like “The Anger of the Waters” and the title story, “Two Cakes Fit for a King,” provide colorful explanations of the world and how it works. “The Story of Watermelon Island” offers readers a glimpse of the traditional agrarian values and way of life that are the foundation of Vietnamese society. Imaginative and captivating, funny and sometimes tragic, these tales have remained popular and culturally significant for Vietnamese, young and old, for hundreds of years. The intricate illustrations draw on centuries-old painting styles and on natural imagery and everyday life in Vietnam.

User Ratings and Reviews

5 Stars Ten Tales Fit for Everyone
“Two Cakes Fit for a King” is a delightfully entertaining and informative little volume featuring ten Vietnamese folktales, each fascinating in its own way. Something about these deceptively simple stories vividly reveals the worldview and attitudes of the many anonymous people who passed them down from generation to generation by word of mouth while also in their own very particular idiom addressing universal concerns that speak to us all–hard work and self-reliance, love and heartbreak, loyalty and patriotism, filial respect and family solidarity, and so on, to say nothing of a healthy regard for the many forces of nature in all of their awesome and yet precariously capricious power.

The translations are straightforward and have a nice storytelling feel to them in an unpretentiously authentic manner. An introduction by Bui Hoai Mai (whose wonderfully if self-consciously folkish illustrations grace each tale) helpfully describes the characteristics and history of Vietnamese folklore in general and then gives a brief outline of each tale’s background and context of ideas and ideals. The tone throughout is very clear and accessible, making this a great book for the interested generalist as well as for those who wish to leapfrog from this introduction onto more detailed and specific treatments of Vietnamese culture and/or folklore studies. It’s a thin, short little book but sitting back with it makes for an afternoon well spent.

Included in this book are the following folk tales:

1. A Daughter’s Love

2. The Anger of the Waters

3. The Golden Voice

4. Princess Lieu Hanh, Tea-Seller of Ngang Mountain

5. The Infant General of Phu Dong Village

6. Three Drops of Blood

7. The Toad Is the Uncle of the King of Heaven

8. Two Cakes Fit for a King

9. The Story of Watermelon Island

10. The Story of Thach Sanh

4 Stars A good contribution.
The authors are to be thanked for bringing to us ten folktales from Vietnam.

The stories dealt with love, betrayal, hope, but also disappointment. There were kings, lovely princesses, as well as smart commoners. Like in any folktale, the good guy ended up winning. The story about the “three drops of blood” does not seem to be genuinely Vietnamese though.

This is a good introductory book for readers who would like to understand a little more about the Vietnamese and their folklore.

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Sweet Cakes Long Journey The Chinatowns of Portland Oregon Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies

Sweet Cakes Long Journey The Chinatowns of Portland Oregon Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies




Around the turn of the twentieth century, and for decades thereafter, Oregon had the second largest Chinese population in the United States. In terms of geographical coverage, Portland’s two Chinatowns (one an urban area of brick commercial structures, one a vegetable-gardening community of shanty dwellings) were the largest in all of North America.

Marie Rose Wong chronicles the history of Portland’s Chinatowns from their early beginnings in the 1850s until the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in the 1940s, drawing on exhaustive primary material from the National Archives, including more than six thousand individual immigration files, census manuscripts, letters, and newspaper accounts. She examines both the enforcement of Exclusion Laws in the United States and the means by which Chinese immigrants gained illegal entry into the country.

The spatial and ethnic makeup of the combined “Old Chinatown” afforded much more contact and accommodation between Chinese and non-Chinese people than is usually assumed to have occurred in Portland, and than actually may have occurred elsewhere. Sweet Cakes, Long Journey explores the contributions that Oregon’s leaders and laws had on the development of Chinese American community life, and the role that the early Chinese immigrants played in determining their own community destiny and the development of their Chinatown in its urban form and vernacular architectural expression.

Sweet Cakes, Long Journey is an original and notable addition to the history of Portland and to the field of Asian American studies.

User Ratings and Reviews

5 Stars Very Good!
This has got to be the most in-depth book on the creation of a Chinatown (or any neighborhood for that matter) in the United States. Anyone interested in community development, the Asian American experience, or Chinese immigration to the U.S. should read this book. Very good black and white photos, maps, and reproductions of old documents.

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Asian occasion Cheesecake Factory prepares its first foray into foreign flavors with a new restaurant line that will serve Oriental fare launching Asian article from Los Angeles Business Journal

Asian occasion Cheesecake Factory prepares its first foray into foreign flavors with a new restaurant line that will serve Oriental fare launching Asian article from Los Angeles Business Journal




This digital document is an article from Los Angeles Business Journal, published by Thomson Gale on February 20, 2006. The length of the article is 985 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Asian occasion: Cheesecake Factory prepares its first foray into foreign flavors with a new restaurant line that will serve Oriental fare.(launching Asian restaurants)
Author: Rachel Brown
Publication: Los Angeles Business Journal (Magazine/Journal)
Date: February 20, 2006
Publisher: Thomson Gale
Volume: 28 Issue: 8 Page: 6(1)

Distributed by Thomson Gale

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I Love You Like Crazy Cakes

I Love You Like Crazy Cakes




Mother-love is profound, however a baby comes into a woman’s life. For Rose Lewis, the journey to motherhood begins with a letter to Chinese officials, asking if she can adopt from the “big room with lots of other babies.” The infants in that room in China are each missing a mother, but Lewis is missing something, too–a baby. She travels to China to meet her new little girl and falls head over heels in love. Taking her baby home to America, Lewis introduces her to all her family and friends, and they begin their life together.

A touching love story, I Love You Like Crazy Cakes will warm the cockles of any new parent’s heart, especially those who have recently adopted a child. It’s an ideal story for lap-time reading, and will inspire parents and kids to talk about their own first “meetings,” whether at birth or in an adoption agency. Jane Dyer, illustrator of the bestselling Time for Bed by Mem Fox, Oh My Baby, Little One by Kathi Appelt, and many other marvelous picture books, uses a pastel palette of watercolors to capture the tender moments between the American mom and her rosy-cheeked Chinese baby. (Ages 3 to 6) –Emilie Coulter

User Ratings and Reviews

5 Stars Treasured Gift for Adoptive Families!
Rose Lewis creates a wonderful story to share with adoptive children and parents. I Love You Like Crazy Cakes is sure to be a special gift for adoptive families, especially mothers. The bond of adoption is beautifully described reflecting on the anticipation and hope of parents while valuing the child’s birthplace and birthparents.

5 Stars Beautiful, Loving Book
What a brilliantly written and illustrated book. It explains in gentle language how much these children are truely loved by both mothers and that there are other ways to make a family. This was a favorite of my daughter for her first five years and I could not read it to her without tearing up. Even now it brings back such loving emotions and memories of the day we met our precious daughter. If I could give this book a 10 rating, I certainly would. This beautiful, loving book is a must have in any adoptive childs library.

5 Stars If you’re considering adopting from China, BUY THIS BOOK!
After reading this book with our two daughters hundreds of times, I still get choked up at certain parts. Lewis does an amazing job of telling this realistic story that is not overwhelming for children, yet still interesting to adults. I first read this book when my husband and I were very early in the adoption process and had narrowed our possible “country list” down to 2 or 3. After bursting into tears halfway through the book in a Barnes and Noble, I told my husband, “Buy this book for me and we’re going to China!” You will definitely want a copy to save and a copy to share; it’s that important of a book if you are adopting from China.

5 Stars My daughter loves this book
Our 2 year old daughter, adopted from China, asks us to read this one again and again. She always points out the page where the baby is handed to her mommy for the first time and touches the tears of the baby… “sad eyes.” It’s all she can do to wait until the final pages where she exclaims “now happy!”

I think this book captures that special and amazing “birth” really well. The process for an international adoption… paperwork, waiting, travel, uncertainty… all becomes a distant memory the minute that baby is placed in your arms. This book brings me back to that glorious day that we will never forget– and a day that is important to celebrate. I think part of why my daughter loves it is that she sees how it touches me (it’s a hugging book, for sure!)

5 Stars Courtesy of Kids @ Teens Read Too
WIth I LOVE YOU LIKE CRAZY CAKES, author Rose Lewis brings to lifer her true story of adopting a baby from China. What begins as a letter to Chinese officials ends with bringing home a baby girl, to the delight of her new mother and extended family.

Jane Dyer’s illustrations are soft and dreamy, and perfectly compliment the story of Rose and her daughter, Alexandra Mae-Ming Lewis. From that first time of holding her new daughter, to the first night alone back in America, the feelings of love and devotion are evident on every page.

Although this is a book sure to appeal to parents who have adopted children from other countries, specifically China, it’s a great story for any child, adopted or not. In fact, my daughter was especially enamored by the book, since it was her first introduction as to what adoption truly means.

Great as a bedtime or any time story, it’s no wonder that I LOVE

YOU LIKE CRAZY CAKES is well on its way to becoming a children’s classic.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka “The Genius”

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Classic Asian Cakes and Desserts Quick and Delicious Favorites Learn to Cook Series

Classic Asian Cakes and Desserts Quick and Delicious Favorites Learn to Cook Series



User Ratings and Reviews

4 Stars Sweet treats from the southeast
Lime Pie, Cashew Tarts, Mango Icebox Cake, Layered Cinnamon and Nutmeg Cake, Pineapple Tarts, Egg Tarts, Steamed Caramel Cake, Egg and Milk Bonbons, Light Butter Cookies, Sweet Potato Cakes, Flan, Doughnuts, Pancakes, Custards, Puddings and Sweet Red Bean Soup they’ve covered so much in this little beginner book. I wish they included more recipes from other parts of northern asia.

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In the matter of certain Asian style kamaboko fish cakes SuDoc ITC 1 12 337 TA 378

In the matter of certain Asian style kamaboko fish cakes SuDoc ITC 1 12 337 TA 378



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The Runaway Rice Cake

The Runaway Rice Cake




Although they have rice flour enough for only one nin-go–the Chinese New Year’s rice cake–the Chang family is determined to make the best of their holiday treat. But when Momma takes the cake out of the steamer, “something incredible happened–the rice cake came alive!” Stunned, the Changs watch as it pops out of the pan and rolls right out of their kitchen, crying, “Ai yo! I don’t think so!” Much like the family in the traditional classic, The Gingerbread Boy, the Changs chase that pastry all through the village, but it eludes them every step–until it runs smack into an old woman. Generous Da, the youngest son, upon discovering that this woman is hungry, too, offers to share the nin-go. This leaves nothing for the Chang family’s New Year’s feast, but their kind-hearted deed reaps them benefits they never imagined from the approving Kitchen God.

Ying Chang Compestine’s tale of compassion and generosity teaches a valuable, perennially fresh message. Tungwai Chau’s acrylic paintings of the family celebrating their most important holiday are rich with details of traditional Chinese life. A note about the Chinese New Year includes recipes for nin-go, the good-luck cake that is said to bring safety and fortune to the entire family all year long. (Ages 5 to 8) –Emilie Coulter

User Ratings and Reviews

4 Stars bought for Chinese New Year
This is a variant of the gingerbread man. It also has magic and a moral. My older daughter, 6 enjoyed this and took it to school.

5 Stars great book about sharing
we loaned this book from library, and it fascinated my 3 yr old. It’s a typical Asian morality story, but with vivid characters and country theme illustrations. the rice cake recipe works really well.

4 Stars a look at the celebration of the Chinese New Year
This book is an excellent addition to a library collection on China or on various types of New Year celebrations around the world. A recipe for both baked and steamed nian-gao is included at the end. In the reading aloud, this book has a subtle message about sharing and compassion although I think the text gets a little irritating when, over and over, “something incredible happened”. Just as a description is not made more so by the endless use of “very”, an event is not made more incredible when it is announced in advance that it will be incredible… and, in fact, it detracts a bit from the magic. I think the text could be a bit more sophisticated but, overall, this is still a wonderful story to share.

2 Stars The Rice Cake Gets Eaten
First, let me say that we own many children’s books that represent Chinese culture, particularly since my husband is Chinese. So, we try to be culturally sensitive to different views of what makes a happy ending. However, both my daughter and I found it disturbing that the adorable rice cake which had been anthropomorphized for several pages was eaten. My daughter and I discussed how the gingerbread gets eaten in some versions too, and that this reflects different views of storytelling. However, this did little to make her feel better for the cute eaten rice cake. She couldn’t sleep–definitely not a bedtime story. Beware if you are used to sanitized fairy tales.

5 Stars Great for the classroom!
I teach 3rd-4th graders with learning disabilities who often also have short attention spans. This book held their interest until the very end. Our class made the recipe for rice cake that is provided in the book. We baked it while I read the story. It is a beautiful story with a nice moral about being unselfish. Illustrations are wonderful too. I loved it and so did the kids. I highly recommend.

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Lemongrass And Sweet Basil Traditional Thai Cuisine

Lemongrass And Sweet Basil Traditional Thai Cuisine




Creating the tastes of Thailand is an irresistible challenge for cooks who love the pungent combinations and subtle balance of ingredients. True to Thai traditions, Lemongrass and Sweet Basil features recipes based on Royal Thai Cuisine, but the author has moved from the highly decorative and intricately carved presentation to a more easy-to-follow, modern approach.

The key to successful Thai cooking is using the best and freshest produce that you can find, so the book starts by detailing the main ingredients that are essential to the Thai cook. This is followed by clear instructions on the cooking methods and techniques that are used to achieve the unique Thai flavors.

Based on the traditional recipes of each Thai region, every cook has his or her own version of a dish including the addition of a secret ingredient or two. Kham shares with us over 50 of his recipes from Isan and Central, Southern, and Northern Thailand. Also included is a chapter of Thai “tapas,” Khap Klaem with mouthwatering dishes such as Fresh Oysters with Spicy Thai Sauce and Drunken Noodles.

The stunning photographs accompanying the recipes give a strong sense of the Thai way of life. The beautiful location photography shows the seamless integration of food and the Thai Buddhist religion and the vibrant and informative food photographs reflect the Thai’s liking for strong color and the importance of garnishes.

Thai people have a passion for the best ingredients, a passion for eating, a passion for the experience of sharing good food. Be inspired by this and create a delicious meal for your family and friends.

User Ratings and Reviews

5 Stars Great starting point.
This is a sweet, simple book that provides a great introduction to the ingredients and techniques you need to begin making basic Thai dishes. It is not exhaustive or particularly creative, but accomplishes what it sets out to do. With clear instructions, glossary, and balanced flavor combinations, I’ve found the recipes (which range from homemade curry pastes to marinades, soups and noodles) accessible and delicious. Recommended for the inexperienced Thai cook.

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SoulTsunami Sink or Swim in New Millennium Culture

SoulTsunami Sink or Swim in New Millennium Culture




Will the tsunami wave of change sweep Christianity away? Or will religious followers be able to ride the cresting tidal wave of cyberterrorism and social malaise that threaten Christian values in the 21st century? Rather than sink into denial or flee to safe bunkers, Sweet suggests that devout Christians “hoist the sails” just as Noah did when faced with a flood. “While the world is rethinking its entire cultural formation, it is time to find new ways of being the church that are true to our postmodern context,” writes author Leonard Sweet, vice president of postmodern Christianity at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey. This book is packed with suggestions (framed as “Life Rings”) for keeping Christianity a thriving and vital global force. “Life Ring” chapter titles include “Get Glocal–the Global Renaissance,” and “Get De-Churched-De-Everything.” Although the tsunami metaphor feels overextended, devout Christians appreciate the savvy and passionate vision of this popular author.

User Ratings and Reviews

5 Stars Good Book
Sweet made some amazing predictions about postmodern culture in this book

4 Stars a tad redundant, but good
I really enojoyed Leonard Sweet’s book “Postmodern Pilgrims” and felt like it had an awful lot of really good things to say about the postmodern paradigm shift. I say that to say that I came into reading this book in a very positive way, and looked forward to what I was going to read.

The book overall was pretty good. I liked a lot of the content, and I liked the way that he seeks to engage the postmodern world, which I believe is an absolute must for ministry now. Not that he says we need to all become postmodern, but that we need to ENGAGE the culture with the gospel, and should therefore have a clue about the culture.

My main critique of the book is that he tends to overstate his points: excessively. So instead of saying “the sky is blue,” we’re going to get more like “The sky is blue, and furthermore the sky is not black but it’s blue, and furthermore it’s not red but it’s blue. The sky is blue.” That’s being overdramatic, but that’s the sense I got from the book. It could have been a lot shorter, and still have covered the same amount of material.

5 Stars Good Book
Sweet wrote this in 99 and you would be amazed how some preditions about ppostmodern culture have come true

5 Stars Forecast of a Post Modern Tidal Wave
Acting as a cultural meteorologist, Leonard Sweet wrote Soul Tsunami in 1999 as a forecast of the Post Modern tidal wave that was about to strike the shores of American Christendom. As he predicted, the wave has hit and has left many casualties in its wake. The church body count continues to rise, while wise leaders who prepared for it are thriving.

The book serves as an introduction to ministry in a Post Modern culture. At times he seems to be an apologist for Post Modernity. You probably won’t always agree with the writer but he will give you a look into the mind of the culture. His presentation of the current ministry realities makes this a significant book and certainly worth the read.

Sweet is a chaotic, quirky, witty, and sometimes annoying writer. If you want a real experience, listen to the audio book. It is a unique and an attention keeping creation. In fact, I’d recommend the audio version over the written effort.

5 Stars bellisimo!
‘the most creative times in history are those hinge moments when chaos and order overlap’…this is extreme reality!

noticed how fast the world is moving around you? hai notato di come il mondo intorno va veloce? this book is INCREDIBLE helped me face the world with a new determination! questo libro e’ INCREDIBILE mi ha aiutato ad affrontare il mondo con una nuova grinta! Wake up and smell the Espresso!!!

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Cases illustrative of oriental life And the application of English law to India decided in H M Supreme court at Bombay

Cases illustrative of oriental life And the application of English law to India decided in H M Supreme court at Bombay



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